Honey bees swarm this season


Submitted photo Jim Myers, a member of the Greene County Beekeepers Association said he has captured two swarms of bees thus far this year from his own hives. He explained that honey bees may swarm this season due to overcrowding at their hives. If individuals sees a swarm, Myers advised them not to be afraid as the bees are mostly docile at this point because they have just gorged themselves on honey before leaving the hive. He compared the bees to humans after a Thanksgiving meal — their bodies are full and they are unable to reach around to deliver a sting. If an individual spots a swarm, Myers recommends contacting the Greene County Beekeepers Association as the group can provide someone to help rid the area of the swarm.


Submitted photo Jim Myers, a member of the Greene County Beekeepers Association said he has captured two swarms of bees thus far this year from his own hives. He explained that honey bees may swarm this season due to overcrowding at their hives. If individuals sees a swarm, Myers advised them not to be afraid as the bees are mostly docile at this point because they have just gorged themselves on honey before leaving the hive. He compared the bees to humans after a Thanksgiving meal — their bodies are full and they are unable to reach around to deliver a sting. If an individual spots a swarm, Myers recommends contacting the Greene County Beekeepers Association as the group can provide someone to help rid the area of the swarm.


Submitted photo

Jim Myers, a member of the Greene County Beekeepers Association said he has captured two swarms of bees thus far this year from his own hives. He explained that honey bees may swarm this season due to overcrowding at their hives. If individuals sees a swarm, Myers advised them not to be afraid as the bees are mostly docile at this point because they have just gorged themselves on honey before leaving the hive. He compared the bees to humans after a Thanksgiving meal — their bodies are full and they are unable to reach around to deliver a sting. If an individual spots a swarm, Myers recommends contacting the Greene County Beekeepers Association as the group can provide someone to help rid the area of the swarm.

Submitted photo

Jim Myers, a member of the Greene County Beekeepers Association said he has captured two swarms of bees thus far this year from his own hives. He explained that honey bees may swarm this season due to overcrowding at their hives. If individuals sees a swarm, Myers advised them not to be afraid as the bees are mostly docile at this point because they have just gorged themselves on honey before leaving the hive. He compared the bees to humans after a Thanksgiving meal — their bodies are full and they are unable to reach around to deliver a sting. If an individual spots a swarm, Myers recommends contacting the Greene County Beekeepers Association as the group can provide someone to help rid the area of the swarm.

Submitted photo Jim Myers, a member of the Greene County Beekeepers Association said he has captured two swarms of bees thus far this year from his own hives. He explained that honey bees may swarm this season due to overcrowding at their hives. If individuals sees a swarm, Myers advised them not to be afraid as the bees are mostly docile at this point because they have just gorged themselves on honey before leaving the hive. He compared the bees to humans after a Thanksgiving meal — their bodies are full and they are unable to reach around to deliver a sting. If an individual spots a swarm, Myers recommends contacting the Greene County Beekeepers Association as the group can provide someone to help rid the area of the swarm.
http://beavercreeknewscurrent.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_36527.jpegSubmitted photo Jim Myers, a member of the Greene County Beekeepers Association said he has captured two swarms of bees thus far this year from his own hives. He explained that honey bees may swarm this season due to overcrowding at their hives. If individuals sees a swarm, Myers advised them not to be afraid as the bees are mostly docile at this point because they have just gorged themselves on honey before leaving the hive. He compared the bees to humans after a Thanksgiving meal — their bodies are full and they are unable to reach around to deliver a sting. If an individual spots a swarm, Myers recommends contacting the Greene County Beekeepers Association as the group can provide someone to help rid the area of the swarm.

Submitted photo Jim Myers, a member of the Greene County Beekeepers Association said he has captured two swarms of bees thus far this year from his own hives. He explained that honey bees may swarm this season due to overcrowding at their hives. If individuals sees a swarm, Myers advised them not to be afraid as the bees are mostly docile at this point because they have just gorged themselves on honey before leaving the hive. He compared the bees to humans after a Thanksgiving meal — their bodies are full and they are unable to reach around to deliver a sting. If an individual spots a swarm, Myers recommends contacting the Greene County Beekeepers Association as the group can provide someone to help rid the area of the swarm.
http://beavercreeknewscurrent.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_36529.jpegSubmitted photo Jim Myers, a member of the Greene County Beekeepers Association said he has captured two swarms of bees thus far this year from his own hives. He explained that honey bees may swarm this season due to overcrowding at their hives. If individuals sees a swarm, Myers advised them not to be afraid as the bees are mostly docile at this point because they have just gorged themselves on honey before leaving the hive. He compared the bees to humans after a Thanksgiving meal — their bodies are full and they are unable to reach around to deliver a sting. If an individual spots a swarm, Myers recommends contacting the Greene County Beekeepers Association as the group can provide someone to help rid the area of the swarm.
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